As we ease lockdown,
the musée Marmottan Monet is working on its plan to reopen on June the 2nd.
In order to ensure your safety, special visiting arrangements have been made.

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MONET Claude (Paris, 1840 ; Giverny, 1926)
Glycines

1919 entre ; 1920 et
toile (peinture à l’huile) H. 100 cm ; l. 300 cm (sans cadre) ; H. 121.4 cm ; l. 322.4 cm (avec cadre)
Non signé.
inv. 5124
legs Monet Michel (testateur) (1966 acquis)
It was Monet himself who chose the plants to decorate his garden in Giverny. They therefore embodied his personal vision of the ideal garden. In 1905, he had an arch built over the Japanese bridge spanning the water-lily pond. From this hung wisteria imported from China and Japan, falling in “white and mauve bunches, a light mauve that seems to have been painted in watercolor” (Elder, 2010). In 1919 and 1920, Monet painted several canvases of this scene, some of them no doubt to decorate the small house built in the garden of the Hôtel Biron, which had opened as the Musée Rodin in 1919 (see p. 198–9). The project was abandoned in 1921 to the development of the Orangerie des Tuileries. The Musée Marmottan Monet keeps two canvases of same size, dedicated to the wisteria motive. They show garlands of hanging flowers, reaching across from one upper edge of the canvas to the other, falling and floating in a delicate atmosphere of lilachues.